Skip Navigation
Menu
 
 
 

  Kindergarten Students Bond

with the Student Body First in Chapel

Each morning bright-eyed kindergartners attend chapel with the elementary and high school students. They love the attention from the older kids, and the older students enjoy the enthusiasm of these little ones. Daily chapel is a precious time of community: little ones imitate the older students in a wholesome way, and the older students know they are being watched by little ‘eagle eyes’. Their interaction breeds a special bond of respect, cooperation, and concern for each other.
 
This is but the beginning of activities throughout the year intended to develop a healthy bond within our school community. This scenario replicates itself year after year. By the time students are second semester seniors, they frequently verbalize in a melancholic tone how much they will miss the sweet moments with these little ones. The feeling is mutual: kindergartners have been known to cry at the seniors’ graduation too!
How can you accomplish this much in half-day Kindergarten class?
Perhaps the best way to describe what Kindergartners learn is to share how the Abeka program works for our kindergarten. “A curriculum with high standards shape not just what children know, but who they become with character-building content that reinforces biblical value.”* When learning is exciting, it is amazing how fast children can learn.

 

Thinking and Learning

“Kindergarten students develop their motor coordination skills, visual discrimination skills, and listening and thinking skills. As they color and cut in a variety of activities, they will also encounter character building exercises.”*

 

Math

“They build early math skills with number
concepts through 100, simple addition
and subtraction combinations, telling time,
number sequences, number words, skip
counting, and working with money.”*
 
Students join the famous “100 Club”
now that they can count to one hundred,
and probably beyond.

Phonics

“Students learn to recognize short vowel, long vowel consonant, and blend sounds before moving on to reading one-vowel and two-vowel words.”*
 
“They will learn and review vowel and consonant sounds, blends, one-and two-vowel words, words with special sounds, and sentence comprehension through a variety of activities. Children will be able to read the 13 small readers by the end of the year."*
 
Kindergarten Tea - Announcing to the world, “I am a reader.”
Each spring is the Kindergarten Tea, a formal celebration of reading from our kindergarten students. Each kindergarten student chooses one of the 13 readers to read before parents, siblings, and grandparents. Standing at a specially constructed podium just their size, they command the room. Then, a celebration ensues with a formal tea.

There are fancy finger foods of little dinosaur-shaped PB & J sandwiches, appetizers of all sorts, and numerous small party desserts arranged on crystal platters and silver trays.
 
High school seniors prepare tiny appetizers and serve the special guests. This is an important day to celebrate. It is the Kindergartners’ announcement to the world: “I am a reader.”
 

Kindergartners can begin reading the most important book in the world – the Bible.

Social Studies

“Students learn about America and the people around them. The focus is on community helpers, American people, American places, plus the geography and culture of ten other countries. These studies help our children become responsible citizens and good stewards of creation.”*
 

God’s World

Young students are inspired to go out and explore their world as they learn how science gives glory to a Creator God.*
 
Students explore the world around them, focusing upon the weather, seasons, seeds, animals, and the seashore. Students will "visit" different environments, observing plants and animals from a Christian perspective.*
 

Art

Children are introduced to basic art concepts such as painting and shapes while continuing to build their coordination and fine motor skills.*
 

Bible

Students learn the major stories of the Old Testament. We discuss the lessons we can gain from these real people that will apply to our lives.